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Doce de Leite

Doce de Leite
Dulce de leche is the most common name for milk caramel in Latin America. Made as both a thick jam and a caramel candy, it is prepared by slowly heating sweetened milk to create a product that derives its taste from caramelised sugar. Its origin is widely debated, and it remains popular throughout Latin America, where it is known by this name in...
Dulce de leche is the most common name for milk caramel in Latin America. Made as both a thick jam and a caramel candy, it is prepared by slowly heating sweetened milk to create a product that derives its taste from caramelised sugar. Its origin is widely debated, and it remains popular throughout Latin America, where it is known by this name in Argentina, Uruguay, Bolivia, Paraguay, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and Costa Rica; in Chile, Ecuador and Panama (where it is known as manjar); in Peru and Colombia (where it is known either as manjar blanco or arequipe depending on regional variations); in Mexico and Nicaragua (where it is known as cajeta); and in Brazil (where it is known by its Portuguese name doce de leite). A home-made form of dulce de leche is sometimes made by boiling an unopened can of sweetened condensed milk for 2 to 3 hours (or 30 to 45 minutes in a pressure cooker), particularly by those living in countries where it cannot be bought ready-made. It is dangerous to do this on a stove: if the pot is allowed to boil dry, the can will overheat and explode.[2]Dulce de leche is used to flavor candies or other sweet foods, such as cakes, cookies (see alfajor) or ice cream, as well as crème caramel (flan in Spanish and Portuguese). It provides the "toffee" part of English Banoffee pie. It is also popular spread on pancakes and toast. French confiture de lait is commonly served with fromage blanc; a Dutch variety (really, a caramel paste), marketed as Bebogeen, is a children's favorite on bread.A solid candy made out of dulce de leche, similar to the Polish krówki and named Vaquita (little cow), was manufactured by the Mu-Mu factory in Argentina until the company went out of business in 1984 (as a consequence of financial speculation by its owners). Subsequently, other brands began to manufacture similar candies, giving them names such as Vauquita and Vaquerita in an effort to link their products to the original.In 1997, the ice cream company Häagen-Dazs introduced a dulce de leche-flavored ice cream; in the same year, Starbucks began offering dulce de leche-flavored coffee products.[3] In the early part of 2009, Girl Scouts of the USA introduced dulce de leche flavored cookies as part of their annual cookie sales program.[4]A similar recipe is used to prepare basundi in India. It is like a less condensed dulce de leche, flavoured with cardamom and is eaten as dessert. The Philippines also has dulce de leche, which is usually paired with cakes or breakfast rolls.This is also known in Russia as boiled concentrated milk (such being the Russian equivalent of sweetened condensed milk).
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